Archives for : hazardous materials

National Park Service: Good Neighbor or Bully?

The unilateral decision by the Superintendent of the Colorado National Monument, Lisa Eckert, to ban what she calls ‘hazardous materials’ loads from using Monument Road to reach the ranching community of Glade Park, has stirred up a hornet’s nest of indignation–and for good reason. More than 100 residents of Glade Park crowded into the town’s small Community Center along with 2 Mesa County Commissioners and members of the county’s planning board. Following a short presentation on the Glade Park Plan, the focus of the meeting quickly turned to the unfriendly, and some would say hostile, decision by the National Park Service (NPS)  to ban cargo such as propane, fertilizer, and other essentials from entering the Colorado National Monument. (Please refer to the previous article)

One county commissioner had a copy of a letter dated June 14, printed on official National Park Service letterhead from Eckert that was supposedly delivered to all the residents of Glade Park. None of the residents present at the community meeting recognized the letter announcing the decision to prohibit “hazardous cargo” on the Monument effective August 1, 2014. The letter also contained references to “listening sessions” held by the NPS to field “concerns” about safety on Monument Road. Except for a meeting last March, no one could recall an actual process where Eckert or her fellow rangers received significant public input about the decision. Below is a copy of Eckert’s letter:

The thing most troubling to the residents of Glade Park is the utter disregard for their lives and livelihoods. The National Park Service acting unilaterally to impose a harmful rule without input from locals is, in the words of one county commissioner, “unacceptable.” Park Service representatives at the Glade Park meeting promised to revisit the issue and convey the residents’ concerns to Lisa Eckert, who conveniently was not present. This story is certainly not over. Monument Road has been litigated in the past, and may again be litigated if the NPS fails to reverse its groundless new policy. Mesa County Commissioners and the ranchers of Glade Park have, in the past, counted on the NPS to maintain a “cooperative relationship” with all players, but not unlike other federal agencies in other states, they are looking less like a good neighbor, and more like the bully next door.

Lisa Eckert, the Superintendent of the Colorado National Monument who seeks to ban fuel haulers from Monument Road can be reached at  (970) 858-3617 ext. 300